“My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers

Lillian Sellers

 “My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers On her blog, Lillian Sellers expresses that confidence is more important than anything else in the transition process, and shares that it's so important for schools to include more self-advocacy training for students and presuming competency training for teachers. My name is Lillian Sellers, and I … Continue reading “My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers

“Covid and Transition to Adulthood”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

Jessica Keagh

The Covid -19 pandemic has proven to be challenging for all, but for people with disabilities the struggles were intensified. As an adult living and working with a physical disability, I can attest to the challenges posed by Covid. Because of my disability I rely heavily on the support of care attendants who assist me … Continue reading “Covid and Transition to Adulthood”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

“Creating room for disability in the discussions of equity: microaggressions”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

Jessica Keagh

The intent of this post is to educate, widen your perspective, and begin to make room for disability in equity discussions. Over the past week, I’ve had the privilege to attend a couple of professional development opportunities which focused on equity, resilience, and learning the English language. Each one of these sessions was incredible, and … Continue reading “Creating room for disability in the discussions of equity: microaggressions”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

“The Disability Agenda Could Bring Unity to A Fragmented Society”, by Josie Badger

In senior government class in high school and then in political science in college, I know that I read about the Constitutional Convention and I probably even read some of the Federalist Papers. I memorized the information I needed for the test and moved on (watching Hamilton was like a brand-new story that I had … Continue reading “The Disability Agenda Could Bring Unity to A Fragmented Society”, by Josie Badger

“Redesigning the Employment Narrative”, by Kyann Flint

Kyann Flint

The dawn of the disability rights movement brought forth the entrance of the disability community onto the scene of the rigid modern-day workforce. This work structure was not built with disability in mind. Workers with disabilities had to conform to this structure and ask for accommodations in hopes that they would be accepted rather than … Continue reading “Redesigning the Employment Narrative”, by Kyann Flint

“Intersectionality: Buzzword among activists advocating for diversity and inclusion”, by Karli Jayne Miller

Karli Jayne Miller

Coined by Black scholar and civil rights activist Kimberlé Crenshaw in her 1989 work, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics”, the term intersectionality refers to the multiple dimensions of discrimination faced by those with multiple marginalized identities. In other words, intersectionality is … Continue reading “Intersectionality: Buzzword among activists advocating for diversity and inclusion”, by Karli Jayne Miller

“Living Breathing Intersectionality” By Whitney A. Ford

Whitney A. Ford

Intersectionality is defined as “the interconnected nature of social organizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage” according to Oxford Languages Dictionary. The intersectionality theory, was developed by Kimberle’ Williams Crenshaw, an African American lawyer, Civil Rights … Continue reading “Living Breathing Intersectionality” By Whitney A. Ford