My journey to a Job I Love, By: Rachel Shandler

Work Hard, Be Kind, Believe in Yourself And Amazing things will Happen   Graduating from college, the next step in many people’s lives is finding a job. For most people that is not always easy. It includes steps like building a resume, where to look for job, and interview preparations. For someone with a disability, … Continue reading My journey to a Job I Love, By: Rachel Shandler

Homecare is self-care, by Anomie Fatale 

As a physically disabled person who can’t independently do all their ADL’s (acts of daily living), people seem surprised when they ask me “Who takes care of you?” and I respond take care of myself.” I’ve had many caregivers since becoming disabled. Before I had homecare services, I was dependent on friends and partners helping … Continue reading Homecare is self-care, by Anomie Fatale 

My disabled journey to employment (and understanding), by Anomie Fatale

My disabled journey to employment (and understanding), by Anomie Fatale Before I became disabled, I wanted to be a doctor or medical researcher.  It was a realistic goal. I had the intelligence, drive, grades, and most importantly, I had the health for it. I was a 3.9 GPA in college with an entrance into a … Continue reading My disabled journey to employment (and understanding), by Anomie Fatale

What I didn’t know then: Wildfire displacement as a wheelchair using parent, by Alex Wegman

Alex Wegman Family Picture

What I didn't know then: Wildfire displacement as a wheelchair using parent, by Alex Wegman I’ve always understood that access and independence are fluid and mean different things for different people. What’s modified for my access might create barriers for another person, and what works for me in one environment or situation might not in … Continue reading What I didn’t know then: Wildfire displacement as a wheelchair using parent, by Alex Wegman

“My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers

Lillian Sellers

 “My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers On her blog, Lillian Sellers expresses that confidence is more important than anything else in the transition process, and shares that it's so important for schools to include more self-advocacy training for students and presuming competency training for teachers. My name is Lillian Sellers, and I … Continue reading “My Experience with Disability and Leadership”, by Lillian Sellers

“Covid and Transition to Adulthood”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

Jessica Keagh

The Covid -19 pandemic has proven to be challenging for all, but for people with disabilities the struggles were intensified. As an adult living and working with a physical disability, I can attest to the challenges posed by Covid. Because of my disability I rely heavily on the support of care attendants who assist me … Continue reading “Covid and Transition to Adulthood”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

“Creating room for disability in the discussions of equity: microaggressions”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

Jessica Keagh

The intent of this post is to educate, widen your perspective, and begin to make room for disability in equity discussions. Over the past week, I’ve had the privilege to attend a couple of professional development opportunities which focused on equity, resilience, and learning the English language. Each one of these sessions was incredible, and … Continue reading “Creating room for disability in the discussions of equity: microaggressions”, by Jessica Keogh, M. Ed

“The Disability Agenda Could Bring Unity to A Fragmented Society”, by Josie Badger

In senior government class in high school and then in political science in college, I know that I read about the Constitutional Convention and I probably even read some of the Federalist Papers. I memorized the information I needed for the test and moved on (watching Hamilton was like a brand-new story that I had … Continue reading “The Disability Agenda Could Bring Unity to A Fragmented Society”, by Josie Badger